Saturday, August 30, 2014

Touring Missouri's Civil War Sites-- Part 2: "Kill Devil"

The fall tour will take Hwy 67 south, then west on 72 to Arcadia and then north on 21 to Caledonia.  All of the sites visited will be connected just to the Civil War in Missouri for the year 1864 with special emphasis on the Battle of Pilot Knob fought September 27, 1864.  (I've never heard of that battle.)

One of the first stops will be at St. Francois State Park where bushwhacker Sam Hildebrandt lived in a cabin and hid in a nearby cave whenever Union forces came looking for him.  The tour will visit the cave and his burial spot.  Hildebrandt was quite the ruthless killer and would carve a notch in his rifle for each Unionist he killed.He was also known for his penchant of shooting unarmed prisoners.  His rifle, nicknamed "Kill Devil", had between 80-100 notches.

I wonder if the rifle is still around?

That "Kill Devil."  --Old Secesh


Friday, August 29, 2014

Touring Missouri's Civil War Sites-- Part 1

From the June 13, 2014, Webster-Kirkwood (Mo.) Times by Don Corrigan.

Ever heard of old "Kill Devil,"  Missouri's Swamp Fox or the "Screaming Eagle?"Well, I always thought "Kill devil" was where the Wright brothers flew that plane and I know about the Revolutionary War's Swamp Fox.

If you want to find out about them, book a trip with the "Road Scholar" for a tour of Missouri's Civil War sites this fall.

Civil War historian Greg Walk will be conducting the pilot tour to Big River Mills, Fredericktown, Arcadia Valley, Pilot Knob and Potosi.

All the Civil War Missouri You'd Want.  --Old Secesh

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Alonzo Cushing to Receive Medal of Honor-- Part 2

Alonzo Cushing was born in Delafield, Wisconsin, and raised in Fredonia, New York.  he is buried at his alma mater, the USMA at West Point after being killed at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863, at age 22.

At the battle, he commanded 110 men and a battery of six cannons on Cemetery Ridge until he was hit by a bullet in the head.  He had earlier been wounded as well and was down to just two cannons and was out of long-range ammunition at the time of his death.  He should have withdrawn.

More than 1500 Medals of Honor were awarded during the Civil War, the first war of its existence.  The last Civil War medal of Honor to be awarded before this was one to Corporal Andrew Jackson Smith of Clinton, Illinois, which was awarded in 2001 by President Clinton.

The Cushing name is prominent in Delafield in southeast Wisconsin where there is a monument to him and his two brothers, Cmdr. William Cushing, USN and Ar,y 1st Lt. Howard Cushing.  This monument is in Cushing Memorial Park where the town celebrates Memorial Day.

The two other Vietnam veterans receiving Medals of Honor were Donald Sloat who was KIA on Jan. 17, 1970   Bennie Adkins earned his in 1966.

Now, It Is Time to Consider a Medal of Honor for Alonzo's brother William, Whose Exploits Along the Coast Surely Deserve One As Well.  --Old Secesh

Alonzo Cushing to Receive Medal of Honor-- Part 1

From the August 27, 2014, San Diego, Cal., CBS 8 "Civil War officer to receive Medal of Honor" by Nedra Pickler.

It took over 150 years for this gallant officer to receive this honor, due largely to a decades-long effort by his descendants and Civil War buffs.

On August 26th, it was announced by the White House that 1st Lt. Alonzo H. Cushing, who was killed while standing his ground against Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863, would be receiving a long-delayed Medal of Honor.

Last December, Congress gave Cushing a special exception to receive the honor posthumously.  Normally, in order to receive one, recommendations must be made within two years of the act of heroism.

President Obama will present the award on September 15th along with two Vietnam War veterans who also received the Congressional special-exception.  They are Army Command Sgt. Major Bennie D. Adkins and Army spc Donald P. Sloat.

--Old Secesh


Wednesday, August 27, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington-- Part 25: Captured, Exchanged, Wounded, Wounded and Captured Again

JAMES R. SPRY, Private, Co. B, 8th N.C.: Born in Currituck County where he resided as a farmer before enlisting at age 19 on August 5, 1861, for war.  Captured at Roanoke Island on Feb. 8, 1862, and paroled at Elizabeth City on Feb. 20, 1862.  Exchanged at Aikens Landing, James River, Va., on Nov. 10, 1862.

Present or accounted for until wounded near Drewry's Bluff, Va., on or about May 13, 1864.  Rejoined company prior to Sept. 30, 1864.

Wounded in left arm and captured at Fort Harrison, Va..  Hospitalized at Fort Monroe, Va., then transferred to Point Lookout, Maryland around October 5, 1864.  Paroled Point Lookout and transferred to Boulware's Wharf, James River, Va., where he was received March 19, 1865, for exchange.

Died Feb. 12, 1924 and buried at Arlington National Cemetery along with his wife, Mary.

--Old Secesh

N. C. Confederates Buried at Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 24

SIMEON SWANSON, color corporal, Co. E, 44th N.C.:  Born Franklin County where he resided as a farmer before enlisting at the age 20 on Feb. 13, 1862.  Mustered in as a private.  promoted to color corporal March-Oct. 1863.

Captured at Bristoe Station, Va. on Oct. 14, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C., Dec. 15, 1863 with "variola."  Died Jan. 12, 1864.

WILLIAM TUCKER, private Co. C, 33rd N.C.:  Resided Cabarrus County where he enlisted at age 21 on Feb. 22, 1862.  Present or accounted for until wounded in the thorax and captured at Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.

Hospitalized in Washington, D.C..  Died May 21, 1863 of wounds.

--Old Secesh

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Victory & Surrender: Appomattox's 150th Anniversary-- Part 3

Among the cast members is a direct descendant of one of the notables in the event, the great-great-grandson of Union General Ulysses S. Grant, John G. Griffiths, 76, of Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Griffiths wore the Union blue in the movie (it didn't mention whether he played his g-g-granddad, however), but said in the past he has re-enacted as a Confederate and has been an extra in other park service films and in Hollywood, including the epic film "Gettysburg."

Appomattox's 150th anniversary events are planned for April 8-12, 2015, culminating in the stacking of arms at Appomattox Court House National Historical Park's Historic Village.

--Old Secesh

Monday, August 25, 2014

Victory and Surrender-- 150th Anniversary of Appomattox-- Part 2

Because the new film is being shot in high definition with surround-sound, park staff decided to upgrade the projector and speakers for "more of a theater experience."

About 80 people volunteered to be in the film and a number of Appomattox County animals will also star in it.

The film calls for men about the average age of Civil War soldiers, 18-24, to accurately portray the time.
The Appomattox 1865 Foundation is responsible for casting the men and managing the animals.

In between takes, the park's historian re-positioned people and changed clothing to ensure authenticity.  They even slathered Appomattox red clay mud onto the horse's legs and men's boots and trousers, something that would have been seen a lot during the hard campaigning back in 1865.  The male actors did not shave for a week.

--Old Secesh

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Victory and Surrender: Appomattox's 150th Anniversary-- Part 1

From the August 18, 2014, Marine Corps Times "Victory & Surrender" by AP.

New film and more for Appomattox's 150th anniversary.

A new film is being made featuring actors portraying the individuals from that momentous occasion almost 150 years ago.  Just like then, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant rode a horse to the McLean House in Appomattox, Virginia, followed by seven officers, where he was greeted by some of his soldiers.

This film is being made by the Appomattox Court House National Historical Park and hopefully it will be finished in time for the 150th anniversary in April 2015.

In addition, it will include Gen. Robert E. Lee and the stacking of arms by Confederate soldiers after the surrender.  There will also be information not included in the park's current films, made in 1975 and 1980.  It will include Lincoln's assassination and the contributions of 3,000 black troops in the Appomattox Campaign and civilian life at Appomattox.

More to Come.  --Old Secesh

Thursday, August 21, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 23

WILLIAM A. SINK:  private Co. F, 5th N.C.:  Born in Davidson County where he resided before enlisting in Wake County at age 27, July 15, 1862, for war as a substitute.  Present or accounted for until captured at Crampton's Pass, Md., September 14, 1862.  paroled on or about Sept. 26, 1862.

Returned to duty prior to March 1, 1863 and present or accounted for until captured at Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14, 1863.  Confined Old Capitol Prison October 16, 1863.  Died in a Washington, D.C. hospital on Feb. 19, 1864, of "chronic diarrhoea."

WILLIAM STRAYHORN,  private Co. H, 1st N.C.:  Born Alamance County where resided as a farmer before enlisting at age 19 on May 21, 1861.  Present or accounted for until captured at Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14, 1863.

Confined at Old Capitol Prison on Oct. 15, 1863.  Died in a Washington, D.C. hospital Jan. 21, 1864, of "diarrhea chronica."

--Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried Arlington-- Part 22

CHARLES W. RIEL (or RIAL),  corporal, Co.  H, 6th N.C.:  Born in Germany and resided in Guilford County before enlisting in Caswell County at age 27 on June 12, 1861, for war.  Mustered in as a private and promoted to corporal Oct. 1, 1862.

Present or accounted for until wounded in the right leg and captured at Rappahannock Station, Va., November 7, 1863.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C. and died Nov. 14, 1863.

NATHAN A. ROGERS, private Co. F, 44th N.C. Infantry.  Born in Chatham County where he resided until enlisted at age 19 on March 11, 1862 at Love's Store.

Present or accounted for until captured at Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison on October 15, 1863.  Died at Washington, D.C. hospital Dec. 7, 1863, of "diarrhea chronica."

Stay Away from Old Capitol Prison.  --  Old Secesh


Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Lincoln County, North Carolina

I came across this county's name on a couple soldiers buried at Arlington national Cemetery and was wondering about the name of the county.  Surely the state wouldn't name a county after the president of the Union.

They didn't, it was named for Benjamin Lincoln, a Revolutionary War officer.

--Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 21

LEVI REINHARDT, private Co. F, 23rd N.C. Infantry:

His body was removed from Arlington National Cemetery in Octiber 1883, along with 106 others and reinterred in the Confederate Section at Raleigh's Oakwood Cemetery.

Resided in Catawba County where he enlisted March 10, 1863, for the war.  Present or accounted for until wounded in the leg and captured at Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 12, 1864.

His leg was amputated.  Died at Carver Hospital in Washington D.C. hospital May 30, 1864, of "pyaemia."  Federal medical records give his age at 39 and is listed as the first Confederate soldier buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

--Old Secesh

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington Nat. Cemetery-- Part 20

URIAH RASH, private Co. H, 44th N.C..  No further information.

OBED REEP, private Co. K, 23rd N.C..  resided in Lincoln County.  Enlisted Iredell County at age 22 August 20, 1862, for war.

Present or accounted for until captured at Mine Run, Va., on Nov. 28, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison.  Died in Washington, D.C. hospital on Feb. 2, 1864, of "phthisis pulmonialis."

Getting sent to the Old Capitol Prison seemed to be tantamount to a death sentence.

--Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington-- Part 19

WILLIAM O. POLLARD, private Co. C, 44th N.C.:  Born and resided in Pitt County, farmer.  Enlisted Pitt County on Jan. 27, 1862.  Present or accounted for until captured at Bristoe Station, Va., on Oct. 14, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison.  Died Nov. 19, 1863, of "diarrhea chronica."

JOHN B. RALPH,  private Co. H, 5th N.C.:  Enlisted Halifax County at age 21 on May 30, 1861, for war.  Wounded and captured at Williamsburg, Va.m May 5, 1862.  Died of wound.  Place and date of death not reported.

--Old Secesh


Monday, August 18, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington-- Part 18

VIRGIL PLAFF, Private Co. D, 57th N.C.:  Resided Forsythe County where enlisted at age 20, July 4, 1862, for war.    Hospitalized in Richmond, Va., September 29, 1862, with measles.  Returned to duty Oct. 29, 1862.

Wounded in right leg and captured at Battle of Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862.  Right leg amputated.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C. and died on or about December 29, 1862 of his wound.

--Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington-- Part 17

HENRY W. OVERCASH, Co. B, 57th N.C.:  Of Rowan County, enlisted at age 27 on July 4, 1862, for war.  Hospitalized Richmond, Va.,  September 22, 1862.  Furloughed for 20 days Oct. 16, 1862.  Returned to duty June-Feb. 1863.  Sent to hospital from camp near Port Royal, Va. Feb. 25, 1863.  Hospitalized Richmond April 25, 1863 with typhoid fever.  Transferred to another hospital May 1, 1863.

Returned to duty prior to September 1, 1863.  Wounded in chest and captured at Rappahannock Station, Virginia, November 7, 1863.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C. and died of wounds Dec. 10, 1863.

Company B records show thirteen soldiers with the last name Overcash.

Just when he though he was over being sick.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

General Samuel Cooper, CSA

Some more information on him.

From Find-a-Grave site.

(1798-1876)  Graduated USMA in 1815 and assigned to various artillery units until 1837 when he was appointed chief clerk of the U.S, War Department.

Served in the Seminole and Mexican wars.  Appointed adjutant general in 1832.

Buried at Christ Church Episcopal Cemetery in Alexandria, Virginia.

--Old Secesh

The Highest-Ranking Confederate Officer Is Generally Unknown

From the May 14, 2014, Washington Post "Alexandria lecture highlights the highest-ranking Confederate general" by Linda Wheeler.

Samuel Cooper is not a name known to most Civil War buffs, but he was actually the Confederacy's highest-ranking officer, even having seniority on Robert E. Lee.

There was a lecture given May 15th by Marion Dawson, his great-great granddaughter.

Cooper resided in Alexandria.  When the war began, he resigned as Adjutant General of the U.S. Army and volunteered his services to the newly-formed Confederacy.  He was named adjutant and inspector general and reported immediately to his old friend, Jefferson Davis.

Initially appointed with the rank of brigadier general, he was quickly promoted to full general, the first to hold that position in the Confederate Army, thereby outranking even Lee.

After Richmond fell, he took the records of the Confederacy and fled until captured in North Carolina, where he turned the records over.  These are the ones currently in the National Archives.

--Old Secesh


Friday, August 15, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 16

JONATHAN H. NICKRNS, private Co. A, 5th N.C.. Sampson County, farmer.  Enlisted in Wake County at age 18 on May 23, 1861, for war.

Wounded and captured at Williamsburg, Va., May 5, 1862.  Hospitalized Washington, D.C. and died  May 20, 1862, (probably of wounds).

--Old Secesh

Thursday, August 14, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington: the Moores

JULIAN GODWIN MOORE and WILLIAM E. MOORE:  Both of these men were buried at Arlington National Cemetery after the war.  They were in an artillery battalion stationed around Wilmington and I'll write about them on my "Running the Blockade" blog.

--Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington-- Part 15

CARLOS ELPHONSE LOWRANCE, Co. E, 57th N.C.:  Farmer and part-time teacher.  Enlisted July 4, 1862, at age 31 for war.  Present or accounted for through Oct. 31, 1863.

Wounded and captured at Rappahannock Station, Va., on Nov. 7, 1863.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C., where he died November 16, 1863 of "asthenia."  A detailed description of the wound and treatment as well as illustrations of the "conoidal ball" that killed him can be found in the Medical and Surgical History of the Civil War, 8:583.

JESSE E. MARSHALL, private Co. G, 13th N.C.:  Born Edgecombe County, farmer.  Enlisted there at age 17 on May 8, 1861.

Present or accounted for until wounded and captured at Williamsburg, Va., on May 5, 1862.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C. where he died of the wound June 12, 1862.

--Old Secesh

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington-- Part 14

ARMISTEAD KING, private Co.I, 43rd N.C.:  Born and resided Stokes County, farmer.  Enlisted at age 28 on March 20, 1862.  Reported sick in hospital in Petersburg, Va., July-August 1862.  Returned to duty Sep-Oct 1862  Present or accounted for  through August 1863.

Reported present, but under arrest Sept-Oct 1863.  The reason for his arrest was not reported.  Escaped from the brigade guardhouse on an unspecified date and deserted to the enemy.

Confined at Old Capitol Prison Nov. 8, 1863.. Hospitalized in Washington, D.C., Jan. 3, 1864.  Died on or about Feb. 2, 1864 of pneumonia.  Buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

The November 8, 1863, date when he was confined to the prison was the same time as the battles at Rappahannock Station and Kelly's Ford.

--Old Secesh

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

Presentation Tonight at the MCCWRT: John Wilkes Booth

The McHenry Civil War Round Table will be meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m. at the Woodstock, Illinois Public Library at 414 W. Judd Street.

Tonight's presentation will be given by retired FBI firld agent Richard Stilling and will be "A Historic Account of the Murderous Activity of John Wilkes Booth on the Night of April 14, 1865.

You can find more information at www.mchenrycivilwar.com.

I will be there.

--Old Secesh

Epriam Latham: Confederate Sergeant, Union Captain

Still working with the very interesting Confederate Burials in Arlington National Cemetery site, and, even though I am primarily looking at North Carolinians buried there, I have been coming across some other interesting ones which I am including.

Here was a man who served as an enlisted Confederate and a Union officer.  Quite interesting.

EPRIAM LATHAM was born in 1838 in Jackson County, Alabama and died August 30, 1893, in Washington, D.C..  He was the son of Jonathan and Elizabeth Ball Latham.

Mustered into Co. C, Mead's Company, 26th Alabama 17 September 1861, as a sergeant.

Deserted with the rank of lieutenant in June 1863 and joined the Union Army as captain of Co. A, 1st Tennessee & Alabama Independent Vidette Cavalry 28 August 1863.  Served as captain until discharged.

Definitely a story that needs more research.

Why Would He Want to Later Be Buried With Confederates?  --Old Secesh

John F. King, Confederate Colonel, U.S. Representative, Buried Arlington National Cemetery

Son of John Butler King, born St. Simon's Island, Georgia, on April 20, 1842.  Educated at Russell School in New Haven, Ct., and Bartlett's College Hill School in Poughkeepsie, NY, the Military Institute of Georgia and the University of Virginia.  This makes me think his family was rich.

Served in the Army of Northern Virginia, eventually rising to the ran of colonel in the artillery.

After the war, he became a U.S. representative from Louisiana and died May 8, 1915, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery in the Confederate Section.

--Old Secesh

Juliet Ana Ople Hopkins "The Florence Nightingale of the South"-- Part 2

Her second husband was a judge on the Alabama Supreme Court and he was named State Hospital Agent in 1861, with the understanding that his wife would carry out the duties of the post.

Mrs. Hopkins often went out onto the battlefields and was once wounded which left her with a permanent limp.  Gen. Robert E. Lee praised her work.

She died while visiting her daughter in Washington, D.C. on May 9, 1890, and was buried at the grave site of her son-in-law, Union General Romeyn Beck Ayers.    Her marker stone was not erected until 1987.  She is not buried in the Confederate Section, but in Section 1.

--Old Secesh

Monday, August 11, 2014

Juliet Ana Ople Hopkins "The Florence Nightingale of the South"-- Part 1

Juliet Hopkins is also buried at Arlington National Cemetery, but not in the Confederate section.

She was born in Jefferson County, Virginia, on May 7, 1818.  During the Civil War she established hospitals in Richmond, Virginia, in 1861 and also got the Matron Alabama Hospitals started.

She was often in the thick of action and was wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines in 1862.  So highly was she regarded in Alabama, that her portrait was on the 25 cent piece and $50 bills issued during the war.

Her first husband was Commodore Alexander Gordon, whom she married in 1837 (he died in 1849).  She married Judge Arthur F. Hopkins in 1854.

--Old Secesh

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Old Capitol Prison-- Part 3

During the war, the Old Capitol prison as it was now called, was expanded to include the adjoining row of houses called Duff Green's Row.  Famous inmates included spies Rose Greenhow, Belle Boyd, John Mosby and Henry Wirz, commander of Andersonville, who was hanged in the yard of the prison.  There were many hangings at the Old Capitol Prison.

The Lincoln Conspirators were held there, including Dr. Samuel Mudd, Mary Surratt, Louis Weichmann and John T. Ford, owner of Ford's Theater.

It was sold in 1867 to George T. Brown, then sergeant-at-arms of the U.S. senate.  he modified it into three row houses that became known as Trumbull's Row.  In the 20th century, it was used as the headquarters of the National Woman's party.

In 1929, the site was obtained by eminent domain and razed in order to build the U.S. Supreme Court Building.

--Old Secesh

Old Capitol Prison-- Part 2

In 1814, during the War of 1812, the British had burned the nearby U.S. Capitol building, forcing Congress into temporary quarters.  A hotel was pulled down and a temporary Capitol was built in the Federal style of architecture and used from 1815-1819 while the U.S. capitol was being rebuilt.

It was vacated in 1819 and after that used as a private school and then a boarding house.  Famed politician John C. Calhoun died at the boarding house in 1850.

In 1861, the government repurchased it and used it as a prison for captured Confederates, political prisoners, Union officers convicted of insubordination and local prostitutes.

A Varied Career.  --Old Secesh

Friday, August 8, 2014

Old Capitol Prison-- Part 1

From Wikipedia.

Also known as The Old Brick Capitol.

I've been writing a lot about North Carolina Confederates who were held prisoner at the Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C., who contracted diseases there and died.  I've heard of the prison, but didn't know a lot about it, so had to do some research.

It gets its name because it served as the temporary Capitol of the United States from 1815-1819 and then became the Old Capitol Prison during the Civil War.

It was razed in 1929 and its site is presently occupied by the United States Supreme Court.

--Old Secesh


Thursday, August 7, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at ANC-- Part 13: Old Capitol Prison Diseases Killing Them

As I continue, I come across more and more Confederates confined at Old Capitol Prison in Washington D.C., who are dying of disease after being captured without wounds.

ROBERT JOHNSON, private Co. I1th N.C.: Resided in Lincoln County, enlisted March 3, 1863, for war.  Present or accounted for until captured at or near Chester Gap, Va., July 21, 1863.

Confines ta Old Capitol Prison.  Died in Washington hospital on August 25, 1863, of "chronic diarrhea."  Hospital records give his age as 20.

CLARK KINCHEN, PRIVATE Co. C, 44th N.C.:  Born and reside in Pitt County.  Enlisted at age 40 on Feb. 20, 1862.  Present or accounted for until wounded and captured at Bristoe Station, Va..

Confined at Old Capitol Prison and died in a Washington hospital Oct. 14, 1863 of chronic diarrhea.

--Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 12

JOHN HARRIS, Co. H, 24TH N.C.:  No information on him, but I did find that his company was raised primarily in Person County.

SAMUEL HILL, private Co. F, 46TH N.C.:  Born in Randolph County and was a farmer.  Enlisted at age 19 on March 12, 1862.  Present and accounted for for util wounded in the hand at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 13, 1863.  

Returned to duty prior to Jan. 1, 1863.  Present and accounted for until captured at Bristoe Station, Va. on October 14, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison and died in a Washington hospital on December 20, 1863, of "diarrhea chronic."

--Old Secesh

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at ANC-- Part 11

JOHN FINCH. private Co. A, 47TH NC:  Born 5 April 1823 in Nash County, enlisted as a private 1 October 1863 at the age of 40.  Became a prisoner of war at Bristoe Station, Va., in October 1863.

Confined at the Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C. on 18 October 1863 and died of disease there 26 November 1863.  Left a widow and seven children.

Quite old to be enlisting.

WILLIAM H. GUPTON, private Co. K, 44TH NC:  Born at Perry's Mill and resided in Franklin County as a farmer.  Enlisted in Franklin County at age 27, Feb. 26, 1862.

Captured at Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison.  Died in Washington, D.C. hospital April 21, 1863, of "diarrhea chronica."

Quite a few Confederates getting sick at Old Capitol Prison.

--Old Secesh

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Confederates Also Buried at Arlington National Cemetery: Citizen Prisoner and Sculptor

There were a lot of Confederates from other states buried at this very special cemetery, but so far, with the exception of one North Carolinian, they had the most complete service records for the troops from that state.

I did come across two others buried at Arlington which I found of interest.

JAMES EMORY  Died November 16, 1867 and listed as a citizen-prisoner.  I did a quick search, but couldn't find out anything about him.  Was he held prisoner after the war ended?  There has to be a good story there.

SIR MOSES EZEKIAL:  VMI cadet & sculptor of the Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery.  Born in Richmond, Virginia and sergeant in Co. C of the VMI cadets who fought Union forces at the Battle of New Market.  Graduated VMI in 1866.

Became a noted sculptor both in the United States and abroad.  Knighted by the King of Italy.  Died in Italy March 27, 1917, but because of World War I, his body was not returned to the United States until 1921 when his body was buried at the foot of the Confederate Memorial which he had designed and sculpted.

His funeral service was the first ever to be held in the Memorial Amphitheater.

Some Interesting Stories.  --Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 10

It is interesting to note the battles in which they were captured and whether they died from wounds sustained in the battles or disease.  All died in and around Washington, D.C..  Most were captured at the Nov. 7, 1863, Battles of Kelly's Ford and Rappahannock Station or the Battle of Bristoe Station October 14, 1863.

JAMES F. DEAN, private  CO. I, 43RD NC:  Resided in Anson County, enlisted at age 20, feb. 25, 1862.  Present and accounted for until Nov.-Dec., 1862 when reported as absent without leave.

Returned to duty Jan.-Feb. 1863.  Present or accounted for until captured at Mine Run, Virginia on December 3, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D,C, and transferred to a Washington hospital where he died Jan. 2, 1864, of "typhoid pneumonia."

JAMES B. ELLEN, sergeant CO. D, 30TH NC:  Resided in Wake County where he enlisted at age 17 on Sept. 2, 1861.  Mustered in as a private and promoted to sergeant August 20, 1862.

Present and accounted for until wounded in the right lung and captured at Kelly's Ford, Virginia, Nov. 7, 1863.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C., where he died of his wound Dec. 9, 1863.

--Old Secesh

Monday, August 4, 2014

N.C. Confederate Buried at Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 9

NATHAN L. CRAFT, private CO. K, 52ND NC:  Resided in Forsyth County and was a carpenter before enlisting in Wayne County at age 26, Jan. 18, 1863, for war.

Captured at Bristoe Station, Virginia, Oct. 14, 1863.  Confined at Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C. and died in Washington hospital Jan. 11, 1864 of "diarrhoea chronice."

WELDON EDWARD DAVIS, captain CO. B, 30TH NC:  Born 22 May 1838.  Resided in Warren County.  Enlisted at age 23.  Appointed 3rd lt on Aug 16, 1861, 2nd lt. September 26, 1861 and 1st lt. on May 1, 1862.  Promoted to captain on June 13, 1863.

Wounded in right thigh and captured at Kelly's Ford, Virginia, Nov. 7, 1863.  Hospitalized in Washington, D.C. and right leg amputated Nov. 10, 1863.  Died at the hospital Nov. 22nd of the wound.

--Old Secesh

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 7

THOMAS COWAN, lieutenant  CO. B, 3RD NC:  Resided in Brunswick County and appointed 2nd Lt to rank from May 16, 1861.  Promoted to 1st Lt. July 1, 1862.

Wounded and captured at Sharpsburg, Maryland (Battle of Antietam) September 17, 1862 and died in a Washington, D.C. hospital October 4, 1862.

JOHN W. COX,  2ND NC:  Resided in Jones County.  Enlisted at age 20, May 24, 1861, for war.  Present or accounted for until wounded and captured at Kelly's Ford, Va., November 7, 1863.

Admitted to hospital in Washington, D.C. November 9, 1863 and died of the wound December 28, 1863.

--Old Secesh


Saturday, August 2, 2014

N.C. Confederates Buried at Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 7

THOMAS R. CARLTON, private  CO. B, 67TH NC:  Born Wataiga County, farmer.  Enlisted at age 20, September 14, 1861.  Mustered in as 1st sergeant. Reduced in rank March-April 1862.  Captured at or near Frayser's Farm, Virginia, on or about  June 30, 1862.

Confined at Fort Columbus, New York Harbor.  Transferred to Washington, D.C. where he died July 14, 1862, of "typhoid fever."

DANIEL G. COLEMAN, private CO. A, 20TH NC:  Born Iredell County, NC, and was employed as a carpenter.  Enlisted there at age of 22, April 19, 1861.

Wounded in right leg and captured at Chancellorsville, Virginia, May 1-4, 1863.  Right leg amputated.  Died in a Washington, D.C. hospital May 26, 1863 of his wound.

--Old Secesh


Civil War Events in Northern Illinois and Southern Wisconsin in July

This past month had a lot of Civil War-related events in this area.  July 8th, we had a presentation about the Illinois Andersonville, Georgia, monument at the McHenry County Civil War Round Table meeting in Woodstock.

That weekend, there was an Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Re-enactment at Elkhorn, Wisconsin, with an encampment saluting both the GAR and Spanish-American War soldiers.

Then, Saturday and Sunday there was a huge Civil War Days encampment and battle in Lake County, Illinois, at the forest preserve in Wauconda.

Who Says There Isn't Much Civil War here in the Area?  --Old Secesh

N.C.Confederates Buried at Arlington National Cemetery-- Part 6

Before a couple months ago, I was not aware of any Confederates being buried at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia.  These are just some of those from North Carolina.

JAMES D. BOUNDS, private, CO. E, 38TH NC:  Born in Richmond County and was a planter.  Enlisted at age 24, October 31, 1861.  Present and accounted for until his capture at Falling Waters, Maryland, July 14, 1863, during the Confederate retreat after the Battle of Gettysburg.

Confined at Old Capitol Prison in Washington, D.C., where he died April 20, 1864, of  "typhoid fever."

Kind of surprising that he was just a private considering he was of the planter class.  I though they were all officers.

SAMUEL J. BOYCE, sergeant, CO. K., 30TH NC:  Resided in Mechlenburg County where he enlisted at age 18, September 13, 1861.  Mustered in a s a private, promoted to corporal in 1862 and sergeant in 1863.

Wounded in right thigh and captured at Kelly's Ford, Virginia, on November 7, 1863.  He was noted for his coolness and bravery in battle.  Kelly's Ford took place at the same time as the Battle of Rappahannock Station, a battle where a lot of North Carolina troops were captured and many died in and around Washington, D.C..

--Old Secesh